Day with a Difference – 29-Jan-13

Quote of the day
“What is not started today is never finished tomorrow.” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Thought of the day – Ending procrastination – Right now

1) Time travel: How to counteract the irrationality of human nature.

"Time travel" can help here. That is, we need to use concrete mental images of the future more often and more accurately, to represent the future as though it were happening in the present. For example, a person who is procrastinating on saving for retirement might imagine as vividly as possible living on his or her potential retirement savings. To make a future image like this more concrete and accurate, it may be important to set out some numbers for a budget and take into account the reality of the need for and increasing expense of health care in old age. Planning shouldn’t be an abstract notion of "doing it tomorrow." Think about the task in the real context of the day, and think carefully about how these tasks make you feel. This strategy will help you prepare for tip #2.

2) Don’t give in to feeling good: Short-term gain, long-term pain.

When self-regulation fails, it’s often because short-term emotional repair takes precedence over our long-term goals. For example, a task at hand makes us feel anxious or overwhelmed, so we "give in to feel good," seeking immediate emotional relief, and we walk away, leaving the task for tomorrow. Here’s where emotional intelligence is so important to procrastinating less. Learn to recognize that we can have negative emotions without acting on them. Stay put for a minute—don’t walk away. Don’t give in to "I’ll feel more like it tomorrow." Acknowledge the negative emotions, but get started anyway. Progress on a goal provides the motivation for another step forward. Just get started; the negative emotions will pass.

3) Reduce uncertainty and distractions.

Planning is one thing; action is another. In fact, what can make a task aversive to us when we’re simply making an intention or planning is how meaningful a goal is. The less meaningful the goal, the less likely we’ll want to do the task. However, when it’s time to act, aversive tasks—those we’re most likely to procrastinate on—are those for which we’re uncertain how to proceed. We’re most likely to procrastinate on tasks that lack structure. This means that in addition to making your task concrete (see tip #1), it’s important to reduce the uncertainty about how to proceed—and, when it’s time to act, to reduce available distractions as well. Shut off your e-mail, isolate yourself as much as you can, and make sure the environment around you is working to strengthen your willpower and focus, not to undermine your efforts. Speaking of willpower

4) Willpower: How to make the most of the willpower muscle.

A great deal of recent research clearly indicates that willpower is like a muscle. You can exhaust it more quickly than you might imagine and, when you do, you lose your ability to self-regulate your behavior. One immediate method to strengthen your resolve in order to keep you on task is to remind yourself of your values. This process of self-affirmation bolsters our flagging reserves of willpower. Another self-regulatory boost can come from mindfulness meditation. Attention is the first step in self-regulation, so learning to keep focused attention will help you procrastinate less by strengthening self-regulation.

Source: http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200909/ending-procrastination-right-now

Joke of the day
The Most Stupid Procrastination Joke Ever..

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***Coming soon***

Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 29-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 28-Jan-13

Quote of the day
“Success is not counted by how high you have climbed but by how many people you brought with you.” – Wil Rose

Thought of the day – A team that rows together grows together

The number of crew members aboard any project team may vary, but teamwork is always essential to keep the boat afloat. Yet even when the boat stays above water, without a common direction the rowers will find that they quickly run out of energy and resources. In rowing, success comes from a common effort to reach the finish line, stay on the course, and follow all the right rules. These skills and agreements can only come through practice. Teams work countless hours to develop a common language and pattern of muscle behaviors. In businesses, success also comes from a common effort, but there are no practices. Every day is a different risk and a different opportunity. Dry runs are often lost opportunities, as opposed to crucial first steps. Teamwork has to be built and promoted in more subtle ways. Indeed, at some point every member of the team will likely have to work with their manager, other teams, a finance department, and clients—these interactions are hard to practice. The best practice—in both rowing and in business—is to keep the crew regularly updated on their progress. Whether they’re about to win the month or about to lose the race, improvements can’t happen without having a solid understanding of where you stand. Even more importantly, each crew member needs to feel responsible and take accountability for their contribution to the team.

Direction is just as vital to teamwork. The leader—the coxswain, in rowing—sits at the stern and is responsible for steering the boat. She should know the course better than any of the crew members, and have the benefit of experiencing past successes and failures. The coxswain needs to be able to adapt for the abilities of every member of the team, and manage a pace that’s sustainable over the long haul. Rowers sit with their backs to the front. They can’t see where they’re going. In order to be effective, rowers need to be able to trust the judgments of their leader. Like in business, a shared set of values makes this easier. Is second-place good enough? Are personal-bests victories?

Destruction. On some days, the winds and waters help the boat make progress. At other times, it can feel like the elements are determined to stop you in your tracks. When that happens, adaptation is the only way to survive. Rowers might have to modify their tactics midstream, or even swap roles in order to keep going. Businesses need to be flexible with their strategies, habits, and job roles as well. Every now and then, non-work non-rowing team-building activities can be helpful (Pro tip: If you’re a business, take the team rowing! And if you’re a rowing team, stick everyone in an office and see how long they last!). Both mandatory and optional team building exercises have their pros and cons, so have a conversation with your team before you begin anything too serious. In the end, in rowing, in business, and in life, what’s truly important is that people move in tandem, support one another, and work to find success for everyone. Were everybody to follow their own paths, we would all spin in circles. Worse still, conflicting interests can cause people’s efforts to counteract one another, destroying productivity and generating turmoil. With properly teamwork properly managed and leveraged, any boat can move in any direction at any speed.

Source: http://tribehr.com/blog/teamwork-is-rowing-and-growing-together/

Joke of the day
1 Bob Smith, my assistant programmer, can always be found
2 hard at work at his desk. He works independently, without
3 wasting company time talking to colleagues. Bob never
4 thinks twice about assisting fellow employees, and always
5 finishes given assignments on time. Often he takes extended
6 measures to complete his work, sometimes skipping coffee
7 breaks. Bob is a dedicated individual who has absolutely no
8 vanity in spite of his high accomplishments and profound
9 knowledge in his field. I firmly believe that Bob can be
10 classed as an asset employee, the type which cannot be
11 dispensed with. Consequently, I duly recommend that Bob be
12 promoted to executive management, and a proposal will be
13 executed as soon as possible

Addendum:
That idiot was standing over my shoulder while I wrote the report sent to you earlier today. Kindly re-read only the odd numbered lines

Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 28-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 25-Jan-13

Quote of the day
“Don’t go through life, grow through life.” – Eric Butterwort
Thought of the day – Life lessons

Joke of the day
All the passengers are seated on a plane out on the tarmac and the stewardess announces “we’re just waiting for the pilots.”. The passengers look out the window and see two men, dressed as pilots walking towards the plane. Both men are using guide dogs and appear to be blind. There are murmurs among the passengers, and some believe it is a joke. The men board the plane and go into the cockpit. More concerned murmurs and uneasy chuckles from the passengers. The plane taxis normally to the runway and begins it’s takeoff. As passengers look out the window they realize they are nearing the end of the runway. The entire passenger cabin begins screaming but the plane lifts off just before the end of the runway. The passengers calm down and chuckle to themselves. In the cockpit, the pilot turns to his copilot and says “you know, one day those people are gonna scream too late and we’re all gonna die!”
Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 25-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 23-Jan-13

Quote of the day
Do not do to others what angers you if done to you by others. – Socrates
Thought of the day – Myths and Facts about Anger
Myth: I shouldn’t “hold in” my anger. It’s healthy to vent and let it out.

Fact: While it’s true that suppressing and ignoring anger is unhealthy, venting is no better. Anger is not something you have to “let out” in an aggressive way in order to avoid blowing up. In fact, outbursts and tirades only fuel the fire and reinforce your anger problem.

Myth: Anger, aggression, and intimidation help me earn respect and get what I want.

Fact: True power doesn’t come from bullying others. People may be afraid of you, but they won’t respect you if you can’t control yourself or handle opposing viewpoints. Others will be more willing to listen to you and accommodate your needs if you communicate in a respectful way.

Myth: I can’t help myself. Anger isn’t something you can control.

Fact: You can’t always control the situation you’re in or how it makes you feel, but you can control how you express your anger. And you can express your anger without being verbally or physically abusive. Even if someone is pushing your buttons, you always have a choice about how to respond.

Myth: Anger management is about learning to suppress your anger.

Fact: Never getting angry is not a good goal. Anger is normal, and it will come out regardless of how hard you try to suppress it. Anger management is all about becoming aware of your underlying feelings and needs and developing healthier ways to manage upset. Rather than trying to suppress your anger, the goal is to express it in constructive ways.

Source: http://www.helpguide.org/mental/anger_management_control_tips_techniques.htm

Joke of the day
A young girl who was writing a paper for school came to her father and asked, "Dad, what is the difference between anger and exasperation?" The father replied, "It is mostly a matter of degree. Let me show you what I mean." With that, the father went to the telephone an dialed a number at random. To the man who answered the phone, he said, "Hello, is Melvin there?" The man answered, "There is no one living here named Melvin. Why don’t you learn to look up numbers before you dial them?" "See," said the father to his daughter. "That man was not a bit happy with our call. He was probably very busy with something, and we annoyed him. Now watch . . ." The father dialed the same number again. "Hello, is Melvin there?" asked the father. "Now look here!" came the heated reply. "You just called this number, and I told you that there is no Melvin here! You’ve got a lot of nerve calling again!" The receiver was slammed down hard. The father turned to his daughter and said, "You see, that was anger. Now I’ll show you what exasperation means." He dialed the same number, and a violent voice roared, "HELLO!" The father calmly said, "Hello, this is Melvin. Have there been any calls for me?"
Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 23-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 23-Jan-13

Quote of the day
“The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can’t read them.” – Mark Twain
Thought of the day
1. Enhanced Smarts

Wow, this may be the most obvious statement of the post, right? Well, it turns out that reading helps in almost every area of smarts. Those that read have higher GPA’s, higher intelligence, and general knowledge than those that don’t. In Anne E. Cunningham’s paper What Reading Does for the Mind (pdf version), she found that reading, in general, makes you smarter, and it keeps you sharp as you age. No matter what you’re wanting to do or become, you can’t do it without more knowledge. Reading is an excellent way to get where you’re wanting to go.

2. Reading reduces stress

When I’m reading a book, my mind shifts gears. Where I might have a had a stressful day, a book can easily distract me. Fiction is fantastic for this. Reading an awesome fiction book is perfect right before bed time. Though sometimes it’s hard to put the book down if it’s really good. Still, you’ll be relaxed 😉

3. Greater tranquility

Reading can soothe like no other. Given that I’m a pretty high-energy person, reading forces me to sit and be still. This daily act of making myself be quiet and still has been nothing short of miraculous for my anxiety and my “fidgety factor”.

4. Improved analytical thinking

Cunningham’s studies have found that analytical thinking is boosted by reading. Readers improve their general knowledge, and more importantly are able to spot patterns quicker. If you can spot patterns quicker, your analytical skills receive a boost.

5. Increased vocabulary

It’s no secret that reading increases your vocabulary and improves your spelling, but did you know that reading increases your vocabulary more than talking or direct teaching? Reading forces us to look at words that we might not have seen or heard recently at the pub. In fact, language in children’s books are likely to be more sophisticated than your average conversation. Increased vocabulary is especially crucial for bloggers or writers. All successful writers will tell you that in order to write well, you need to read. Every day. You’ll be surprised at the words you start incorporating into your writing. A beefier vocabulary isn’t just for writers though. Knowing what other people are saying and using the perfect words to convey your feelings is a critical part of being a better human. Better listeners are more successful in life.

6. Improved memory

I have an awful memory. Just ask my fiancée. I usually can’t remember what I’ve eaten for breakfast, let alone things like names and addresses. Yet I’ve been finding that I can remember stuff much easier when I’ve been reading consistently. Do I have any scientific data to match this up? Not really. But I’d say it’s a pretty safe bet that reading has somehow given me memory mojo.

7. Improved writing skills

This isn’t much of a stretch, considering that reading improves vocabulary and critical thinking. I feel like a better writer, as I’m constantly surrounding myself with works from people who are better than me. That’s why English classes in High School make you read “the classics”. That’s why art students learn to copy masterpieces, so they know what creating something incredible should feel like.

8. Helps prioritize goals

Many times we’re certain we know what we “really want” in life. Yet I’ve found that activities like reading show me things I didn’t know about myself. My mind will drift to things that I’d really like to do, and it isn’t long that these little lapses in reading start to cycle. The same sort of goals keep popping into my head, allowing me to see what I really want to do. For example, I’ve been playing music on a consistent basis, but I’ve always wanted to produce and distribute my own music. As I’ve been reading, I’ve found that song ideas and other general thoughts on music keep popping into my head. It’s my times reading that have really pushed me into giving music a serious go. When you remove yourself from your work environment, you’ll start to see things that you might really want to do, that you’re not doing yet. Reading gives you a chance for your to wander.

Source: http://lifedev.net/2009/06/reading-makes-you-better/

Joke of the day
Q: What do young ghosts write their homework in?
A: Exorcise books.
Q: What sort of people make the best bookkeepers?
A: The people who borrow your books and never return them.
Q: What did one arithmetic book say to the other?
A: I’ve got a big problem
Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 23-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 21-Jan-13

Quote of the day
“People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel” -Maya Angelou
Thought of the day
An elderly Chinese woman had two large pots, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her neck. One of the pots had a crack in it, while the other pot was perfect and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walks from the stream to the house, the cracked pot arrived only half full. For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman bringing home only one and a half pots of water. Of course, the perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments. But the poor cracked pot was ashamed of its own imperfection, and miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream. "I am ashamed of myself, because this crack in my side causes water to leak out all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled, "Did you notice that there are flowers on your side of the path, but not on the other pot’s side?" "That’s because I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path, and every day while we walk back, you water them." "For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to grace the house."

Each of us has our own unique flaw. But it’s the cracks and flaws we each have that make our lives together so very interesting and rewarding. You’ve just got to take each person for what they are and look for the good in them.

Joke of the day
City Lady: Look at that bunch of cows.
Cowboy: No, herd.
City Lady: Heard of what?
Cowboy: Herd of cows.
City Lady: Sure, I’ve heard of cows!
Cowboy: No, a cow herd.
City Lady: What do I care what a cow heard? I’ve got no secrets from a cow!
Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 21-Jan-13

Day with a Difference – 18-Jan-13

Quote of the day
"The world we have created is a product of our thinking; it cannot be changed without changing our thinking." -Albert Einstein
Thought of the day – Daily habits that will increase your mind power
1. Go for a walk with a friend.
That means walking with a friend so that you talk as you walk. Social connection, physical exercise and mental stimulation are the brain strengtheners.
2. Solve Puzzles, Play Games
Playing a game of Sudoku or attempting to solve a difficult crossword sets your brain cells in action. Doctors often advise people who report focus problems to play a video game for few minutes every day to boost brain’s ability to focus on one thing at a time.

3. Meditate
Meditation is easier said than done. But if you could include it in your everyday routine and practice it diligently, it would go a long way in giving you a better memory help to make a better brain.
4. Eat healthy
Our diets have a HUGE impact on brain functioning. Our brains consume over 20% of all nutrients & oxygen that we consume so remember to feed your brain with the good and healthy Stuff.
5. Think positive
Stress and anxiety kills existing brain neurons and also stop new neurons from being created. Research has shown that positive thinking, especially in the future tense, speeds up the creation of cells and dramatically reduces stress & anxiety. Try and get a handle on negative thoughts and makes an effort to leave them and change it to positive ones.

6. Laugh It Up
Laughter causes a natural release of the brain’s endorphins chemicals that drown out pain and increase overall wellbeing. Laughter is a well-known, natural stress reducer. Watch a comedy, crack a joke, and increase those endorphin levels.

7. Listen To Music
Studies have proven that listening to music strengthens the right-hemisphere of the brain and literally changes the structure. Those same studies have found that people who listen to the music are generally much smarter and have more emotional intelligence than those who don’t.
8. Do Self-Hypnosis
The power of hypnotic suggestion is definitely real. You can change aspects of your thought process and learn to shift your focus by taking the time to do some self-hypnosis. Hypnosis research shows that by practicing hypnosis, an individual experiences lowered stress, increased pain tolerance, and clear thinking.
9. Set Goals
Setting goals activates areas of the brain associated with positive thinking and action. Setting goals is great for achieving success and prosperity in life and boosting your brain.
10. Follow a Sleep and Wake up Routine
One day you are night owl and other day, you wake up at 5. This randomness of your sleep pattern is neither good for your body nor for your brain. Better Sleep makes your mind healthy . Sleep sound, wake up fresh and try to stick to a routine.

Joke of the day
Customer: Waiter, what’s the meaning of this fly in my tea up?

Waiter: “How could I know sir, I’m a waiter, not a fortune teller.

Have a great day!

Regards,
Prasanna

Day with a Difference – 18-Jan-13